Unique Homes tagged posts

You’ll Be Climbing the Walls of This Tiny Home

This tiny home packs a bouldering wall, a roll-up garage door and a full-sized soaking tub into just 250 square feet.

There’s no need to park in the mountains when the rock climbing is right at your doorstep. 

At least that’s what the team at Tiny Heirloom figured when they set out to design a tiny home for an intrepid couple looking to take adventure on the road.

The Portland, OR-based company combined two of the things its clients enjoyed most — fitness and being outside — into a 250-square-foot, custom-built home, said Jason Francis, creative director and co-founder at Tiny Heirloom.

The idea for a tiny home with a bouldering wall came from organic brainstorming, Francis said.

“The rock wall really started as a long-shot idea, but the more we thought about it, the more excited ...

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Whale Watch From Any of This Home’s 3 Rooftop Decks

What’s better than a rooftop deck? Three of them. Each with its own sweeping view.

The Olympic Mountains. The Strait of Georgia. The shoreline of Victoria, Canada. And maybe a pod of orcas, if you’re lucky. You can see all of that (and much more) from one of this home’s three rooftop decks.

Located on the rocky shores of San Juan Island, Washington, this coastal retreat has a unique connection to the land it occupies — the home is built directly into the hillside, so it gracefully descends the ground’s natural slope.

A team of architects from Seattle-based firm Prentiss Balance Wickline worked on the design. Dan Wickline, one of the architects on the project, drew inspiration from the island’s stark natural beauty.  

“Rooted into a linear ravine on the site, the spaces of the...

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Hibernate Luxuriously in This 5,572-Square-Foot Cave Mansion

Stalactites? Check. Waterfall? Check. 4 bedrooms and an illustrious guest list? Check, check!

When most people envision their dream home, they describe large kitchens, beautiful hardwood floors and clawfoot tubs. But not John Hay.

In the mid-1980s, Hay — founder of the Celestial Seasonings Tea Company and great-great grandson of U.S. Secretary of State John Milton Hay — purchased the Beckham Creek Cave in Parthenon, Arkansas. He had plans to transform it into a 10,000-square-foot bomb shelter, consisting of cinder-block walls, plywood flooring, 11 coats of clear epoxy on the natural formations of the cave, and an internal freshwater spring.

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He stocked it with enough freeze-dried food to keep 50 people fed for up to two years, and he twice had his religious group sit ...

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This Home Looks Like a Barn (But Has Enough Room to Be a Small Castle)

If you wanted to, you could drive straight through this home’s living room. But it’s too pretty for that …

Like many married couples, the Clarks have a lot in common: a last name, a first name (they’re both Kelly) and an affinity for wide-open spaces — which inspired them to build a 10,000-square-foot barn-style home on 30 acres of land in West Monroe, Louisiana. 

But let’s back up. Kelly Clark (that’s him) and Kelly Moore-Clark (that’s her) wanted a change of scenery for their family. So when a friend put some land up for sale, they decided to make a move.

“We pretty much bought the property sight unseen because you couldn’t walk through it,” Moore-Clark says, referring to the thicket of overgrown trees and plants that carpeted the ground...

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This Isn’t Your Average Woodland Cottage

Constructing these homes is like kneading dough.

“We spend so much of our lives in boxes,” says Alexis Borsboom, owner of this cottage nestled among the trees on Mayne Island, BC.

The unique shape is just one reason she and her husband moved in. The rest of the story lies inside its walls — and begins with the walls themselves.

That’s because they’re made from cob: a combination of clay, sand and straw that’s mixed with water and then sculpted by hand. The couple fell in love after meeting in a cob-building workshop; later, they purchased the home and built a life constructing cob structures together.

With soft edges throughout and a wooden staircase, the interior of their home seems like something out of a dream — but subtle nods to 70s decor make it feel familiar.

Cob is a...

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The Pumpkin Carver’s Lake House: A Home for His Hobby

See how Russ Leno is pursuing his passion in the place he truly calls home.

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‘It would be boring if we all did the same thing’

When he started whittling for fun in his 20s, Russ Leno didn’t know he would one day carve the world’s largest pumpkin.

“I started honing my pumpkin-carving skills because I could be at home with [my kids],” the master sculptor explains.

A design engineer by trade and an artist by heart, Leno relished the days when everything was done by hand. But over time, computers started taking over the job, and he needed a new outlet.

First he started sculpting sand because his friends were doing it, and then he tried his hand at carving snow and ice. Pumpkins were an afterthought.

“It was somebody’s turn to have a party at their place, and they ...

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Step Inside the Castle a Dad Promised to His Son

Wooden knights and a secret passageway add to the home’s magical charm.

Many kids dream of owning their own castle, but John Lavender — owner, designer and builder of the Highlands Castle in Bolton Landing, New York — made his son Jason’s childhood fantasy a reality. After telling his (then) 3-year-old son that he would build him a castle, Lavender delivered on his promise, constructing it from scratch himself. Nestled in the beautiful Adirondacks and overlooking the coast of Lake George, the stone castle sits on nine acres of land and feels as though it was plucked from a medieval English countryside.

Construction on the Highlands Castle began in 1982, and ever since, Lavender has been in the process of constantly building and renovating it to perfection...

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Enter If You Dare: Inside a Real-Life Haunted House

Is that a ghost or just your imagination? See for yourself.

With no city lights for miles, The Pillars Estate stands alone in the darkest of nights.

Inside, guests are greeted by dim candlelight, a windy staircase and a gentleman from Scotland.

Tony McMurtrie purchased the Civil War-era estate in Albion, NY when it was ready to be torn down. Restoring it to its former glory over the past decade, he’s carefully curated every detail — from the grandfather clocks to the silver.

“I don’t know where it comes from,” he explains. “I just like that time and that era.”

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His love of antiques and a refined way of life hasn’t gone unnoticed. Cora Goyette moved to Albion from England and bonded with McMurtrie over their shared appreciation of European culture.

Today, ...

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This Studio Came From a Feed Store

And now it’s a home fit for a fairy tale.

A California couple decided to move east and preserve this Tyringham, Massachusetts, studio. Decades before that, it was a studio of a different kind.

In the 1920s, a local sculptor converted his backyard silo — originally purchased as a kit from a feed store — into a place where he could perfect his craft.

Large mill windows let in plenty of natural light for him to create. Today, that same light casts an ethereal glow over the second-floor bedroom.

Down the spiral staircase, a wood-burning stove and vintage decor give the first floor charm from a bygone era.

The two-story studio sits just behind Santarella, a dwelling lovingly dubbed the Tyringham Gingerbread House — appropriate, since it looks like it’s from a storybook.

The 450-squ...

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This Sky-High Water Tower Doubles as a Rustic Beach Retreat

In this elevated home, every room is a room with a view.

In the 1940s, this Huntington Beach water tower — which stands at around 100 feet tall — serviced the local trains that came through town, connecting the inner city to the beach. Today, it’s a 3,500-square-foot high-rise with unmatched views of the Pacific Ocean, downtown Los Angeles and Catalina Island.

The historic and beloved water tower has long been a fixture of the Huntington coastline, but it was nearly torn down in the 1980s — until the local community pulled together and demanded it be saved.

“There was a huge community outcry to keep it,” said Scott Ostlund, the owner of the water tower home. “People were selling quilts and having meetings on ‘Save Our Water Tower.’”

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Luckily, the tower...

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